[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172590468{margin-bottom: 27px !important;}”]A new study led by Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473840168330{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]As evidence has mounted that distance running is not just a natural human activity enjoyed by millions, but one that played a key role in evolution, a puzzle has emerged. Why, if humans are so well adapted to running long distances, do runners get hurt so often?[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473840176714{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]A study out of Smart School and the National Running Center at Smart-affiliated Templeton Rehabilitation Hospital provides a puzzle piece, linking injury to the pounding runners’ bones take with each step. The work, led by Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart, found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner css=”.vc_custom_1473173012608{margin-bottom: 14px !important;}”][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”8/12″][stm_mg_audio][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473840225554{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Statistics on such injuries vary, but somewhere between 30 percent and 75 percent of runners are hurt annually, a number that has led researchers to investigate a wide array of possible explanations, from modern running shoes to stretching, running frequency, weight, biomechanical misalignment, and muscle imbalance.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][stm_blockquote cite=”Jane Eckhart Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation”]One never injured multi-
marathoner’s stride was so smooth, she ran like an insect over water. Weight was not a factor, with heavy runners among the light-footed and lighter runners among the stompers.
[/stm_blockquote][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473845716506{margin-top: -10px !important;margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]Please meet in the Calderwood Courtyard, in front of the digital screens between the shop and the admissions desk. Museums staff will be on hand to collect tickets.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473845757345{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Jane Eckhart’s research focused on heel-strikers exclusively, since they make up most of today’s runners, and examined a cohort seldom studied, partly because they’re pretty rare: those who have never been injured. They investigated the participants’ strides by having them run over a force plate that recorded the impact of each step.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473840252221{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”]The runners agreed to respond to a monthly online questionnaire that detailed injuries over two years. With the results in, researchers first examined reports from the 144 who experienced a mild injury and the 105 who didn’t, finding little difference between the two large groups.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172590468{margin-bottom: 27px !important;}”]A new study led by Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172543824{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]As evidence has mounted that distance running is not just a natural human activity enjoyed by millions, but one that played a key role in evolution, a puzzle has emerged. Why, if humans are so well adapted to running long distances, do runners get hurt so often?[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172634050{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]A study out of Smart School and the National Running Center at Smart-affiliated Templeton Rehabilitation Hospital provides a puzzle piece, linking injury to the pounding runners’ bones take with each step. The work, led by Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart, found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner css=”.vc_custom_1473173012608{margin-bottom: 14px !important;}”][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”8/12″][stm_mg_audio][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172693280{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Statistics on such injuries vary, but somewhere between 30 percent and 75 percent of runners are hurt annually, a number that has led researchers to investigate a wide array of possible explanations, from modern running shoes to stretching, running frequency, weight, biomechanical misalignment, and muscle imbalance.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”5/12″][stm_blockquote cite=”Francesca Stoppard The Darvin B. Xander Associate Curator of Prints”]One never injured multi-marathoner’s stride was so smooth, she ran like an insect over water. Weight was not a factor, with heavy runners among the light-footed and lighter runners among the stompers.[/stm_blockquote][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”7/12″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172969666{margin-top: -10px !important;margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]With most runners being heel-strikers today, the added shock, multiplied over thousands of footsteps, could explain high injury rates. The 2012 study added fuel to the debate, finding a two-to-one difference in repetitive stress injuries between heel- and forefoot-strikers.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172807857{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Jane Eckhart’s research focused on heel-strikers exclusively, since they make up most of today’s runners, and examined a cohort seldom studied, partly because they’re pretty rare: those who have never been injured. Jane and colleagues recruited 249 female recreational athletes who each ran at least 20 miles a week. They investigated the participants’ strides by having them run over a force plate that recorded the impact of each step.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473173112409{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”]The runners agreed to respond to a monthly online questionnaire that detailed injuries over two years. With the results in, researchers first examined reports from the 144 who experienced a mild injury and the 105 who didn’t, finding little difference between the two large groups.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172590468{margin-bottom: 27px !important;}”]A new study led by Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172543824{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]As evidence has mounted that distance running is not just a natural human activity enjoyed by millions, but one that played a key role in evolution, a puzzle has emerged. Why, if humans are so well adapted to running long distances, do runners get hurt so often?[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172634050{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]A study out of Smart School and the National Running Center at Smart-affiliated Templeton Rehabilitation Hospital provides a puzzle piece, linking injury to the pounding runners’ bones take with each step. The work, led by Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart, found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner css=”.vc_custom_1473173012608{margin-bottom: 14px !important;}”][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”8/12″][stm_mg_audio][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172693280{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Statistics on such injuries vary, but somewhere between 30 percent and 75 percent of runners are hurt annually, a number that has led researchers to investigate a wide array of possible explanations, from modern running shoes to stretching, running frequency, weight, biomechanical misalignment, and muscle imbalance.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”5/12″][stm_blockquote cite=”Francesca Stoppard The Darvin B. Xander Associate Curator of Prints”]One never injured multi-marathoner’s stride was so smooth, she ran like an insect over water. Weight was not a factor, with heavy runners among the light-footed and lighter runners among the stompers.[/stm_blockquote][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”7/12″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172969666{margin-top: -10px !important;margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]With most runners being heel-strikers today, the added shock, multiplied over thousands of footsteps, could explain high injury rates. The 2012 study added fuel to the debate, finding a two-to-one difference in repetitive stress injuries between heel- and forefoot-strikers.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172807857{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Jane Eckhart’s research focused on heel-strikers exclusively, since they make up most of today’s runners, and examined a cohort seldom studied, partly because they’re pretty rare: those who have never been injured. Jane and colleagues recruited 249 female recreational athletes who each ran at least 20 miles a week. They investigated the participants’ strides by having them run over a force plate that recorded the impact of each step.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473173112409{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”]The runners agreed to respond to a monthly online questionnaire that detailed injuries over two years. With the results in, researchers first examined reports from the 144 who experienced a mild injury and the 105 who didn’t, finding little difference between the two large groups.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172590468{margin-bottom: 27px !important;}”]A new study led by Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172543824{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]As evidence has mounted that distance running is not just a natural human activity enjoyed by millions, but one that played a key role in evolution, a puzzle has emerged. Why, if humans are so well adapted to running long distances, do runners get hurt so often?[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172634050{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]A study out of Smart School and the National Running Center at Smart-affiliated Templeton Rehabilitation Hospital provides a puzzle piece, linking injury to the pounding runners’ bones take with each step. The work, led by Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart, found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner css=”.vc_custom_1473173012608{margin-bottom: 14px !important;}”][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”8/12″][stm_mg_audio][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172693280{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Statistics on such injuries vary, but somewhere between 30 percent and 75 percent of runners are hurt annually, a number that has led researchers to investigate a wide array of possible explanations, from modern running shoes to stretching, running frequency, weight, biomechanical misalignment, and muscle imbalance.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”5/12″][stm_blockquote cite=”Francesca Stoppard The Darvin B. Xander Associate Curator of Prints”]One never injured multi-marathoner’s stride was so smooth, she ran like an insect over water. Weight was not a factor, with heavy runners among the light-footed and lighter runners among the stompers.[/stm_blockquote][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”7/12″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172969666{margin-top: -10px !important;margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]With most runners being heel-strikers today, the added shock, multiplied over thousands of footsteps, could explain high injury rates. The 2012 study added fuel to the debate, finding a two-to-one difference in repetitive stress injuries between heel- and forefoot-strikers.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172807857{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Jane Eckhart’s research focused on heel-strikers exclusively, since they make up most of today’s runners, and examined a cohort seldom studied, partly because they’re pretty rare: those who have never been injured. Jane and colleagues recruited 249 female recreational athletes who each ran at least 20 miles a week. They investigated the participants’ strides by having them run over a force plate that recorded the impact of each step.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473173112409{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”]The runners agreed to respond to a monthly online questionnaire that detailed injuries over two years. With the results in, researchers first examined reports from the 144 who experienced a mild injury and the 105 who didn’t, finding little difference between the two large groups.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172590468{margin-bottom: 27px !important;}”]A new study led by Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172543824{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]As evidence has mounted that distance running is not just a natural human activity enjoyed by millions, but one that played a key role in evolution, a puzzle has emerged. Why, if humans are so well adapted to running long distances, do runners get hurt so often?[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172634050{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]A study out of Smart School and the National Running Center at Smart-affiliated Templeton Rehabilitation Hospital provides a puzzle piece, linking injury to the pounding runners’ bones take with each step. The work, led by Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart, found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner css=”.vc_custom_1473173012608{margin-bottom: 14px !important;}”][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”8/12″][stm_mg_audio][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172693280{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Statistics on such injuries vary, but somewhere between 30 percent and 75 percent of runners are hurt annually, a number that has led researchers to investigate a wide array of possible explanations, from modern running shoes to stretching, running frequency, weight, biomechanical misalignment, and muscle imbalance.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”5/12″][stm_blockquote cite=”Francesca Stoppard The Darvin B. Xander Associate Curator of Prints”]One never injured multi-marathoner’s stride was so smooth, she ran like an insect over water. Weight was not a factor, with heavy runners among the light-footed and lighter runners among the stompers.[/stm_blockquote][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”7/12″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172969666{margin-top: -10px !important;margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]With most runners being heel-strikers today, the added shock, multiplied over thousands of footsteps, could explain high injury rates. The 2012 study added fuel to the debate, finding a two-to-one difference in repetitive stress injuries between heel- and forefoot-strikers.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172807857{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Jane Eckhart’s research focused on heel-strikers exclusively, since they make up most of today’s runners, and examined a cohort seldom studied, partly because they’re pretty rare: those who have never been injured. Jane and colleagues recruited 249 female recreational athletes who each ran at least 20 miles a week. They investigated the participants’ strides by having them run over a force plate that recorded the impact of each step.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473173112409{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”]The runners agreed to respond to a monthly online questionnaire that detailed injuries over two years. With the results in, researchers first examined reports from the 144 who experienced a mild injury and the 105 who didn’t, finding little difference between the two large groups.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172590468{margin-bottom: 27px !important;}”]A new study led by Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172543824{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]As evidence has mounted that distance running is not just a natural human activity enjoyed by millions, but one that played a key role in evolution, a puzzle has emerged. Why, if humans are so well adapted to running long distances, do runners get hurt so often?[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172634050{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]A study out of Smart School and the National Running Center at Smart-affiliated Templeton Rehabilitation Hospital provides a puzzle piece, linking injury to the pounding runners’ bones take with each step. The work, led by Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart, found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner css=”.vc_custom_1473173012608{margin-bottom: 14px !important;}”][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”8/12″][stm_mg_audio][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172693280{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Statistics on such injuries vary, but somewhere between 30 percent and 75 percent of runners are hurt annually, a number that has led researchers to investigate a wide array of possible explanations, from modern running shoes to stretching, running frequency, weight, biomechanical misalignment, and muscle imbalance.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”5/12″][stm_blockquote cite=”Francesca Stoppard The Darvin B. Xander Associate Curator of Prints”]One never injured multi-marathoner’s stride was so smooth, she ran like an insect over water. Weight was not a factor, with heavy runners among the light-footed and lighter runners among the stompers.[/stm_blockquote][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”7/12″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172969666{margin-top: -10px !important;margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]With most runners being heel-strikers today, the added shock, multiplied over thousands of footsteps, could explain high injury rates. The 2012 study added fuel to the debate, finding a two-to-one difference in repetitive stress injuries between heel- and forefoot-strikers.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172807857{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Jane Eckhart’s research focused on heel-strikers exclusively, since they make up most of today’s runners, and examined a cohort seldom studied, partly because they’re pretty rare: those who have never been injured. Jane and colleagues recruited 249 female recreational athletes who each ran at least 20 miles a week. They investigated the participants’ strides by having them run over a force plate that recorded the impact of each step.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473173112409{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”]The runners agreed to respond to a monthly online questionnaire that detailed injuries over two years. With the results in, researchers first examined reports from the 144 who experienced a mild injury and the 105 who didn’t, finding little difference between the two large groups.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172590468{margin-bottom: 27px !important;}”]A new study led by Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172543824{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]As evidence has mounted that distance running is not just a natural human activity enjoyed by millions, but one that played a key role in evolution, a puzzle has emerged. Why, if humans are so well adapted to running long distances, do runners get hurt so often?[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172634050{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]A study out of Smart School and the National Running Center at Smart-affiliated Templeton Rehabilitation Hospital provides a puzzle piece, linking injury to the pounding runners’ bones take with each step. The work, led by Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart, found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner css=”.vc_custom_1473173012608{margin-bottom: 14px !important;}”][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”8/12″][stm_mg_audio][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172693280{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Statistics on such injuries vary, but somewhere between 30 percent and 75 percent of runners are hurt annually, a number that has led researchers to investigate a wide array of possible explanations, from modern running shoes to stretching, running frequency, weight, biomechanical misalignment, and muscle imbalance.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”5/12″][stm_blockquote cite=”Francesca Stoppard The Darvin B. Xander Associate Curator of Prints”]One never injured multi-marathoner’s stride was so smooth, she ran like an insect over water. Weight was not a factor, with heavy runners among the light-footed and lighter runners among the stompers.[/stm_blockquote][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”7/12″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172969666{margin-top: -10px !important;margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]With most runners being heel-strikers today, the added shock, multiplied over thousands of footsteps, could explain high injury rates. The 2012 study added fuel to the debate, finding a two-to-one difference in repetitive stress injuries between heel- and forefoot-strikers.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172807857{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Jane Eckhart’s research focused on heel-strikers exclusively, since they make up most of today’s runners, and examined a cohort seldom studied, partly because they’re pretty rare: those who have never been injured. Jane and colleagues recruited 249 female recreational athletes who each ran at least 20 miles a week. They investigated the participants’ strides by having them run over a force plate that recorded the impact of each step.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473173112409{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”]The runners agreed to respond to a monthly online questionnaire that detailed injuries over two years. With the results in, researchers first examined reports from the 144 who experienced a mild injury and the 105 who didn’t, finding little difference between the two large groups.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172590468{margin-bottom: 27px !important;}”]A new study led by Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172543824{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]As evidence has mounted that distance running is not just a natural human activity enjoyed by millions, but one that played a key role in evolution, a puzzle has emerged. Why, if humans are so well adapted to running long distances, do runners get hurt so often?[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172634050{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]A study out of Smart School and the National Running Center at Smart-affiliated Templeton Rehabilitation Hospital provides a puzzle piece, linking injury to the pounding runners’ bones take with each step. The work, led by Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart, found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner css=”.vc_custom_1473173012608{margin-bottom: 14px !important;}”][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”8/12″][stm_mg_audio][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172693280{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Statistics on such injuries vary, but somewhere between 30 percent and 75 percent of runners are hurt annually, a number that has led researchers to investigate a wide array of possible explanations, from modern running shoes to stretching, running frequency, weight, biomechanical misalignment, and muscle imbalance.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”5/12″][stm_blockquote cite=”Francesca Stoppard The Darvin B. Xander Associate Curator of Prints”]One never injured multi-marathoner’s stride was so smooth, she ran like an insect over water. Weight was not a factor, with heavy runners among the light-footed and lighter runners among the stompers.[/stm_blockquote][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”7/12″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172969666{margin-top: -10px !important;margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]With most runners being heel-strikers today, the added shock, multiplied over thousands of footsteps, could explain high injury rates. The 2012 study added fuel to the debate, finding a two-to-one difference in repetitive stress injuries between heel- and forefoot-strikers.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172807857{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Jane Eckhart’s research focused on heel-strikers exclusively, since they make up most of today’s runners, and examined a cohort seldom studied, partly because they’re pretty rare: those who have never been injured. Jane and colleagues recruited 249 female recreational athletes who each ran at least 20 miles a week. They investigated the participants’ strides by having them run over a force plate that recorded the impact of each step.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473173112409{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”]The runners agreed to respond to a monthly online questionnaire that detailed injuries over two years. With the results in, researchers first examined reports from the 144 who experienced a mild injury and the 105 who didn’t, finding little difference between the two large groups.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172590468{margin-bottom: 27px !important;}”]A new study led by Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172543824{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]As evidence has mounted that distance running is not just a natural human activity enjoyed by millions, but one that played a key role in evolution, a puzzle has emerged. Why, if humans are so well adapted to running long distances, do runners get hurt so often?[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172634050{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]A study out of Smart School and the National Running Center at Smart-affiliated Templeton Rehabilitation Hospital provides a puzzle piece, linking injury to the pounding runners’ bones take with each step. The work, led by Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart, found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner css=”.vc_custom_1473173012608{margin-bottom: 14px !important;}”][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”8/12″][stm_mg_audio][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172693280{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Statistics on such injuries vary, but somewhere between 30 percent and 75 percent of runners are hurt annually, a number that has led researchers to investigate a wide array of possible explanations, from modern running shoes to stretching, running frequency, weight, biomechanical misalignment, and muscle imbalance.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”5/12″][stm_blockquote cite=”Francesca Stoppard The Darvin B. Xander Associate Curator of Prints”]One never injured multi-marathoner’s stride was so smooth, she ran like an insect over water. Weight was not a factor, with heavy runners among the light-footed and lighter runners among the stompers.[/stm_blockquote][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”7/12″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172969666{margin-top: -10px !important;margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]With most runners being heel-strikers today, the added shock, multiplied over thousands of footsteps, could explain high injury rates. The 2012 study added fuel to the debate, finding a two-to-one difference in repetitive stress injuries between heel- and forefoot-strikers.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172807857{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Jane Eckhart’s research focused on heel-strikers exclusively, since they make up most of today’s runners, and examined a cohort seldom studied, partly because they’re pretty rare: those who have never been injured. Jane and colleagues recruited 249 female recreational athletes who each ran at least 20 miles a week. They investigated the participants’ strides by having them run over a force plate that recorded the impact of each step.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473173112409{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”]The runners agreed to respond to a monthly online questionnaire that detailed injuries over two years. With the results in, researchers first examined reports from the 144 who experienced a mild injury and the 105 who didn’t, finding little difference between the two large groups.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172590468{margin-bottom: 27px !important;}”]A new study led by Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172543824{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]As evidence has mounted that distance running is not just a natural human activity enjoyed by millions, but one that played a key role in evolution, a puzzle has emerged. Why, if humans are so well adapted to running long distances, do runners get hurt so often?[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172634050{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]A study out of Smart School and the National Running Center at Smart-affiliated Templeton Rehabilitation Hospital provides a puzzle piece, linking injury to the pounding runners’ bones take with each step. The work, led by Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart, found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner css=”.vc_custom_1473173012608{margin-bottom: 14px !important;}”][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”8/12″][stm_mg_audio][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172693280{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Statistics on such injuries vary, but somewhere between 30 percent and 75 percent of runners are hurt annually, a number that has led researchers to investigate a wide array of possible explanations, from modern running shoes to stretching, running frequency, weight, biomechanical misalignment, and muscle imbalance.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”5/12″][stm_blockquote cite=”Francesca Stoppard The Darvin B. Xander Associate Curator of Prints”]One never injured multi-marathoner’s stride was so smooth, she ran like an insect over water. Weight was not a factor, with heavy runners among the light-footed and lighter runners among the stompers.[/stm_blockquote][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”7/12″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172969666{margin-top: -10px !important;margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]With most runners being heel-strikers today, the added shock, multiplied over thousands of footsteps, could explain high injury rates. The 2012 study added fuel to the debate, finding a two-to-one difference in repetitive stress injuries between heel- and forefoot-strikers.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172807857{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Jane Eckhart’s research focused on heel-strikers exclusively, since they make up most of today’s runners, and examined a cohort seldom studied, partly because they’re pretty rare: those who have never been injured. Jane and colleagues recruited 249 female recreational athletes who each ran at least 20 miles a week. They investigated the participants’ strides by having them run over a force plate that recorded the impact of each step.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473173112409{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”]The runners agreed to respond to a monthly online questionnaire that detailed injuries over two years. With the results in, researchers first examined reports from the 144 who experienced a mild injury and the 105 who didn’t, finding little difference between the two large groups.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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